Mother Goose and Nursery Rhymes

By Nancy I. Sanders

My husband Jeff, a fourth grade teacher, and I love books. When we go on vacation, we enjoy visiting the local library and browsing their used bookstore. We always find a special treat to take home with us. At our thrift stores, we head to the book section to see what choice tidbits are on sale. We hang out at local bookstores. For Christmas and birthdays and “just-because” days, our wishlist often includes books.

Pirates Mother Goose
Nancy’s latest children’s book.

Books! Books! Books! Our home overflows with books. Right now, I have 50+ library books spread out in various piles near our different comfy reading spots in different rooms. I used to feel bad about the stacks of books along with the overflowing bookshelves until one day I decided to embrace our passion and designate our home as a “nest of books.”

One of our family’s all-time favorite “eggs” in our nest is our permanent collection of Mother Goose and nursery rhymes as well as “visitors” of treasures that come and go from our local library.

mother goose original

When our boys were young, Mother Goose: The Original Volland Edition was nearly a daily read. The old-fashioned art and delicate colors set the tone for falling in love with the heritage Mother Goose has to offer our family as we passed down each nursery rhyme to the next generation.

mother goose tasha

And Tasha Tudor! Oh, what is any mother’s reading lap without the delightful and rich books of Tasha Tudor! Complete with sweet goslings and adorable kittens, Tasha Tudor’s Mother Goose brings fresh joy with every turn of the page.

walt disney mother goose recording

In our home, however, Mother Goose wasn’t just confined to pages within a book. We still have the vinyl record, Walt Disney Presents Mother Goose Rhymes and Their Stories. We marched around in our own rhythm band clanging pots and pans with wooden spoons while singing along with the record. We sang the songs in the car together and while swinging on the swings. (Swinging simply MUST be accompanied by singing! It’s a tradition from my childhood days that we passed along to our sons and now to our grandson.)

Our collection of Mother Goose “eggs” in our nest still continues to grow as we add new favorites today. It’s little wonder then, that over the years I’ve dreamed of writing my own Mother Goose rhymes to add to the rich traction of childhood pleasures and treasures.

Nancy Sanders Pirate

Raising two boys, pirates were a perennial favorite, so it was only natural for me to combine the rollicking good fun of piratey adventures with the beloved rhymes our family has always enjoyed. My hope is that this new generation of mommies, daddies, and little ones will learn to love Mother Goose and nursery rhymes in a fresh new way!

What are your family’s most cherished books?

Mother Goose and Nursery Rhymes

How can good people do cruel things?

Dear readers,

My new middle grade novel Night on Fire grew out of a question that baffled me when I was young: How can good people do cruel things?

9780807570241_NightonFire

My family was from the South—grandparents, aunts, uncles, cousins. I loved them dearly, and some of them were racists. For the life of me, I couldn’t reconcile those two facts.

Over the years, the question continued to haunt me. As I pondered it, a character emerged: thirteen-year-old Billie Sims. She lived in Anniston, Alabama, a pleasant town filled with good people. In 1961 the Freedom Riders came through town, a group of black and white college students challenging the practice of segregation on buses. Some people in town stopped the Greyhound bus they rode, set it on fire, and beat the students as they spilled out. All the while, good people watched and did nothing. Billie’s father was one of them. So was Billie.

With Billie, I stalked the streets of Anniston, an African American friend at my side, seeking answers and hungry for justice. We found our way to a church rally in Montgomery, where the night split open and we rang a bell—for those who had suffered, for those who stood by, for those who were sorry and wanted to do better.

Ask yourself the question. Then travel with me to Anniston.

Ronald Kidd

Sidenote: Here is the Trailer for “Freedom Riders,” the Stanley Nelson documentary that inspired me to write the book

How can good people do cruel things?

Raising children: How to meditate

by author Whitney Stewart 

I began meditation and yoga in high school after a knee injury kept me from playing sports. At first I struggled with being still and watching my breath. Some days I felt grounded and calm. Other days I felt like a failure because my busy mind was so loud. After thirty years of practice, my mind is still busy, but I watch it as if it were a fountain of colored lights and let it be. Difficulty comes not from mental movement but from becoming lost in thought.

whitney blog post meditating 1

Meditation has taught me to experience an expanded sense of being that is not limited to body or mind. It’s as if my skin disappears and nothing separates me from anything or anyone. In this state, I lack nothing, and I’m inspired to project compassion to those who need it.

After Hurricane Katrina upended New Orleans where I live, I volunteered as a creative writing teacher in a public school. I realized quickly that my fifth-grade students were suffering from stress and family dysfunction and couldn’t easily focus on writing. They fought on the playground and acted out in class. Nobody had taught them skills to self-regulate or resolve conflict.

whitney meditation 2

I used simple meditation techniques with them — breathing and visualizations — and after some weeks, the children responded positively. “I feel like I’m floating on clouds,” one said. “It’s so peaceful,” said another. They began to concentrate more easily, to understand and follow my directions, and to write stories with more narrative depth. More importantly, they had a tool for responding to their own harmful emotions.

Meditation is an Open Sky

I wrote Meditation is an Open Sky so children can learn meditation on their own or in other classrooms or groups. I wish I’d written it sooner for my post-Katrina kids. Wherever they are now, perhaps they still remember how to focus their mind and heart and live with more ease and kindness.

What’s your favorite way to calm your mind?

Raising children: How to meditate

Beach reads: 5 reasons to pick up The Opposite of Loneliness

by author Laura Hurwitz

I am writing this on the heels of a two-week beach vacation, during which I had the gift of time to read.

Beach reads are, by definition, light, easily digestible fare. And while attention spans tend to be shortened when the senses are constantly diverted by pounding surf and five o’clock cocktails, I prefer to read bite-sized quality as opposed to gorging on the literary equivalent of junk food. That’s why I’ve been loving short stories.

A writing teacher of mine once said novels are too large for perfection, but short stories are small enough that they can be polished to near-flawlessness. They can also be read in one sitting and reflected upon for hours, making them the perfect beach read.

oppositeofloneliness image

This summer, one collection of short stories stood out for me: The Opposite of Loneliness, by a young writer named Marina Keegan. Keegan was twenty-two years old when, five days after graduating magna cum laude from Yale and poised to embark on an already- promising literary career, she was killed in a car accident.

  • The stories in The Opposite of Loneliness have no common theme. Keegan explores a variety of relationships, romantic and familial, and every plot is distinctive. One story, “Cold Pastoral”, explores a young woman’s reaction to the sudden death of a quasi-boyfriend; another, the terrifying “Challenger Deep,” is about a submarine that catastrophically loses power, trapping its crew in darkness at the bottom of an unfathomable ocean trench.
  • Keegan writes headlong, her youthful zest shaded by an oddly prescient wisdom. She has a natural ability to pace her stories, and her dialogue is effortlessly uncontrived.
  • One of the reviews of her work claims Keegan is “not merely a gifted college writer, but a gifted writer.”
    • This is intended as an accolade, I’m sure, but I disagree. The fact that Keegan is a college writer is precisely why she is so remarkable. She wrote from the perspective that her entire life, with its plans, dreams, and endless possibilities, stretched out before her. She wrote from the carpe diem edge, embodying the unshakeable conviction that her words would someday make a difference to the world. She was, in her own words, the “Yes to everything!”
  • The Opposite of Loneliness is the enduring record of a gifted college writer’s urgent voice, cut short. That it is published posthumously adds a layer of poignancy to Keegan’s words, but even cut loose from the tragic backstory, the narratives shine. They are immediately engaging, which is the single most important attribute of any successful short story.

Tell Me A Riddlethe lottery

After summer is over and the beach is but a distant memory, short stories make for great year-round reading. One of my all-time favorites is Shirley Jackson’s grim, iconic “The Lottery,” which definitely inspired The Hunger Games. I also recommend these collections: Kurt Vonnegut’s Welcome to the Monkey House, Flannery O’Connor’s A Good Man Is Hard to Find, and Tillie Olsen’s Tell Me a Riddle.

Laura Hurwitz is a graduate of Yale University. She is the author of six travel-essay books, maintains a popular blog, and recently began a podcast (parents, please note the content and language). Laura lives with her husband, Sam, and, on occasion, some number of her six adult children in Connecticut.  

What’s one of your favorite beach reads?

Beach reads: 5 reasons to pick up The Opposite of Loneliness

5 reasons to read Lilliput on your vacation

by author Suzanne Slade

I’m obsessed with nonfiction books. I like to read thick, technical science books for fun. I read piles of children’s nonfiction picture books to keep abreast of what’s on the market (and because I love them!) On the rare occasion when I do read fiction, it’s a refreshing treat, and I’m pleased to share a new fiction gem I enjoyed while on vacation this summer—Lilliput.

Lilliput cover

To become my official vacation read, Lilliput first had to earn a place in my suitcase. (Sidenote: After years of intensive training, my husband has converted me to a “ultra-light” packer, so this means there was room for only one book in my small bag.) The night before I was to leave on my trip I hadn’t selected a book yet; there were several on my nightstand I’d been wanting to read. I made the executive decision to read the first chapter of each to determine which one was worthy of the trip. Well, the first chapter of Lilliput (only seven pages) hooked me immediately, and it won the spot in my bag.

lilly1

  1. The book was so compelling I finished it long before I returned home from vacation. I love how the main character, Lily, is a great role model for young readers with her unwavering determination and kind nature, despite the constant challenges she faces while trying to make her way back home to Lilliput.
  2. Lilly2The giant villain, Lemuel Gulliver, who kidnapped Lily and held her hostage for proof of his discoveries, supplied wonderful humor—with just the right amount of evil. I enjoyed how the author developed this character, and found myself feeling a tad empathetic toward the giant as I learned of his hopes and disappointments.
  3. Then there’s Finn, the hero, who was trapped by a unique prison of his own, yet he looked beyond his dire circumstances and bravely helped Lily escape.
  4. lily3To top it all off, the illustrations by Alice Ratterree are outstanding! The details she included are incredible, and her lovely action-filled pictures have heart.
  5. In the book’s Afterword, the author, Sam Gayton, shares his initial hesitation to write a story based on characters from Jonathan Swift’s classic tale, Gulliver’s Travels, due to concerns about copyright infringement. He relates a charming family anecdote about how his mom allayed his copyright fears when she declared (with a mouth full of dry scone crumbs), “Miffs fin rer fubric fromay.” Translation—“Gulliver’s Travels is in the public domain.”

If you’re looking for a great read to finish off your summer vacation, especially before heading back to school, Lilliput is the perfect choice. This fresh, daring story about a small girl’s quest for big things—freedom, friendship, and family—is truly magical.

Suzanne Slade is the award-winning author of 100 children’s books. Most days you’ll find her researching new book ideas, reading, writing children’s books, or visiting a school near you!

5 reasons to read Lilliput on your vacation

Kids Books: My childhood adventures

By Barbara Reid, illustrator and author

Madeline coverstuart little

As a child, my travels took place between the covers of books. I read and re-read kids books until I knew the landscapes like the back of my hand. While I haven’t been able to get to Narnia or Through the Looking Glass (yet!), I have visited the Paris of Madeline, the Central Park pond sailed by Stuart Little, the highlands of Robert Louis Stevenson’s Kidnapped and other storied places. Traveling to a book setting is a journey of discovery and a homecoming at the same time.

where the forest meets the sea

When our daughters were young we spent hours pouring over the pages of Jeannie Baker’s Where the Forest meets the Sea. In simple words, a young boy describes a day trip with his father to the Daintree Rainforest in North Queensland, Australia. The real story is in the illustrations. Using modeling clay, papers, textured materials, natural materials and paint, Baker has created stunning relief collages that draw the reader into each page. Along with the narrator, our eyes adjust to the light filtering through the trees and more details appear. The richness of plants, animals and insects is astounding; double exposures hint at creatures and people from the forest’s past, and the boy’s imagination adds to the sense of adventure.

Where the Forest meets the Sea encourages readers to slow down, explore, observe and ask questions, perfectly mirroring the way the boy in the book experiences the forest. The attention to detail and child’s eye view influenced and inspired my own work in creating kids books.

BarbAusTreeDaintree trees[1]

Recently, we followed one of our now grown-up daughters to Australia where we had the opportunity to visit the real Daintree wet rainforest, a UNESCO World Heritage site. The forest was so exactly like Jeannie Baker’s illustrations I thought my head would explode. I couldn’t stop leaping around, pointing and exclaiming. Buttress roots! It’s those ferns! Oh the vines! Look at the butterfly! Oh my gosh, look at the stream! Much to the relief of my family, I eventually was able to slow down, observe and absorb the spirit of the place.

Having read Where the Forest meets the Sea enriched my experience in the rainforest, and experiencing the rainforest heightened my appreciation of the book. This back and forth exchange between art and life is magic—almost like stepping through the looking glass.

Picture A Tree

Author and illustrator Barbara Reid lives in downtown Toronto with her husband and two daughters. At the Ontario College of Art and Design, her focus was illustration, and it was for a class assignment that she first experimented with plasticine artwork. While she likes working with authors and enjoys writing her own stories, she still loves making pictures best of all.

Kids Books: My childhood adventures

Remembering my favorite childhood book

by Sarah S. Brannen, author and illustrator

Ever since my first book was published in 2008, I have been asked the same question in dozens of interviews:

What was your favorite book when you were a child?

For years, I protested that I couldn’t possibly answer the question; I have a favorite painting, a favorite drawing, a favorite piece of music, a favorite sound, but I love far too many books to choose a favorite.

Nutshell librarypeter rabbit

When I think about books that I loved as a child, I visualize one picture book after another, some famous, some less so: Peter Rabbit, Blueberries for Sal, Prince Bertram the Bad, Bartholomew and the Oobleck, One Morning in Maine, Melisande, Mrs. Tiggy-Winkle, The Nutshell Library, to name just a few.

I was complaining about this to my mother one day, when she reminded me that I did indeed have a favorite book when I was little: Burt Dow, Deep-Water Man by Robert McCloskey. As I look at the list of books I just spouted, it seems pretty clear that McCloskey was my favorite author when I was small. And my mother told me the following story, of which I have no memory.

burt dow

I was probably about four years old. My family was staying at Sand Beach Farm on Deer Isle, Maine. My parents had rented a small aluminum boat with an outboard motor, and we headed out for a picnic on an island. We motored along the shore, past McCloskey’s home. I had Burt Dow with me, which must mean that I loved it so much I took it everywhere. My parents pointed out McCloskey’s house and told me the author of my book lived there. I held the book over my head and yelled at the top of my lungs, “Mr. McCloskey, I love your book!”

As I said, I don’t remember doing this. I do remember seeing E.B. White’s sweet little wooden sailboat, “Fern,” on its mooring. The dingy was named “Wilbur.”

Well, after my mother told me the story, I bought a new copy of Burt Dow. (My childhood copy disintegrated long ago; I was the kind of kid who loved books to death). Just looking at the cover gave me a happy shiver. And the title page, with its pots of paint, big spill of pink, and a seagull happily leaving pink footprints? Heaven.

It had been far more years than I care to share since I read the story. But it was all there, so deeply embedded in my memory that I had forgotten where the images came from. The old dory planted with geraniums and sweet peas. The Tidely-Idely, with her make-and-break engine. The giggling gull. “Hit the deck, Burt, time to eat!” The peppermint-striped band-aids. “An old deep-water man like me always keeps a weather eye out.”

And the colors – murky green Maine water, the boat painted in all the colors left over from Burt’s odd jobs, the Pollack-like paint-splashed innards of the whale. And best of all, the spreads filled with whales of all sorts of yummy colors. Read it. You’ll see.

I’ll never know whether this is the book that made me want to be a children’s book illustrator. It was probably only one of many. But it was, definitely, my favorite.

What was your favorite book when you were a child?

Sarah S. Brannen is an award-winning illustrator of over 15 children’s books. She is the author and illustrator of Madame Martine and Madame Martine Breaks the Rules. She lives in Massachusetts but goes to Paris as often as possible. 

Remembering my favorite childhood book

Father’s Day: Authors Tell All Part 1

Summer is officially here, and it’s Father’s Day weekend! Some of our authors sent us a photo of themselves and their dad, telling us how each of our authors’ dads have influenced their lives.

Jacqueline Jules and DaddyZapato Power

(Pictured: Author Jacqueline Jules with her father) My father was an immigrant from Switzerland who came to the United States after World War II. He was unmarried, in his early thirties, and jobless when he arrived. Within ten years, he had learned English and was living a comfortable middle-class life with an American wife and two daughters. Whenever I asked my father why he came to America, he would laugh and say that he’d heard the streets were paved with gold. Daddy loved to travel and to garden. He was keenly interested in world affairs and read several newspapers from cover to cover. In his later years, he took great pride in writing letters to the editor of the publications he read. He spent hours typing on an old gray Underwood typewriter. I learned the power and joy of self-expression from watching him. Daddy also taught me perseverance. He passionately believed that goals could be achieved if you kept working toward them. Whenever I get discouraged, I can hear my father’s voice in my head, saying, “Don’t give up.” While he has been gone since 1999, his presence is always felt.


 

Ian Hoffman Fathers Dayjacobs new dress(Pictured: Author Ian Hoffman with his son and his father) My dad’s a science guy (he’s a radiation oncologist & researcher). I’m an arts guy (I’m an architect & author). Although we like to think about very different things, somehow we think alike. That’s the beauty of genetics. My dad taught me the values of method, care, persistence, and curiosity. He didn’t lay it out like that. I just watched him, and learned from his example. I also learned from my dad to get down on the floor and wrestle with my kids. When we were little, he used to do that everyday when he got home from the hospital. Although eventually I would be impressed by my dad the physician and scientist, it’s still the wrestling I cherish most.


 

Robin and Dad in 1958Mystery of the Stolen Dinosaur Bones

(Pictured: Author Robin Koontz with her dad circa 1958) Warren S. Koontz was head of a U.S. Naval Ordinance division, working as a civilian after World War II. We knew little about that, but we did know that my dad had also been a musician. He led a jazz band before the war and traveled around the world. By the time I came along, the youngest of three, my dad didn’t play music anymore other than on his huge hi-fi system. But on my 4th Christmas, Dad gave me a little electric piano. This is the only photo I have of the two of us – he demonstrating me how it’s played and me in a very untypical pose of patiently learning. My dad died when I was 13. But his creative spark lives on in me as both a writer and illustrator. And I also play the guitar!


 

Linda and Dad 7th gradeCurious Cat Spy Club

(Pictured: Author Linda Joy Singleton [7th grade] and her father) Both of my parents have always been extremely supportive of my writing, but Dad went a step further when I was a teen. I wanted to submit my writing but this was before the internet & it wasn’t easy for a teen to learn about the publishing world. My high school didn’t even have a writing class. Only popular kids wrote for the newspaper—and I was shy. Dad was also interested in writing and wanted to learn how to help me, so he took a college writing class. He taught me how to submit my work, use correct query format and research publishers. So I submitted short stories to a teen magazine, and received very encouraging rejection letters. While it would be over a decade before I sold any writing, when I joined a local writing group I recognized the name of one of my other writers—Dad’s college writing teacher. And she congratulated me when I sold my first book.


The Potato Headshappy dad

(Pictured: Author Felicia Sanzari Chernesky with her father, Stephanie, Francesca, & Jennifer circa 1998) My dad was tough on us growing up. I was the oldest child, quiet, studious, serious—big glasses, straight As, extra English classes by choice—you know the type. As he energetically charged my sisters and me to do our academic and personal best, we learned the meaning, value, and reward of hard work, taking personal responsibility, and standing up for your beliefs. I was always hardest on myself, and Dad frequently reminded me, “You’ve got to learn to laugh if you want to survive the hardships of this life.” He meant it. Plus, the man was funny. I think of Dad presiding at the table during Mom’s wonderful Italian meals, us kids listening to stories and eventually participating in passionate family discussions. Everyone was loud and laughing. Always laughing! Dad passed away last November after being seriously ill for many years. His quick wit never dulled. He loved the winter season, and I dedicated Sugar White Snow and Evergreens to him. He’s there in everything I write. I learned the art of storytelling from my father.


Suzanne Slade with dadWith Books and Bricks

(Pictured: Author Suzanne Slade with her father) My dad is a hard worker, and through the years he’s demonstrated that by sticking with something and giving it your best, you can accomplish almost anything (which came in handy during my many “rejection letter” years.) My dad also loves nature and being outside — sailing, biking, kayaking, fishing, and more. I’ve gone with him on many of his adventures, which have inspired several books. So Happy Father’s Day, Daddy! 

 

Father’s Day: Authors Tell All Part 1

Shower Power: Give a Book!

Kathryn Madeline Allen is the author of A Kiss Means I Love You (2012) and Show Me Happy (2015). She lives in Michigan, where she teaches and writes.

A Kiss Means I Love YouShow Me Happy

 

 

 

 

 

 

I love baby showers! The gifts are precious: itsy-bitsy booties, teeny-tiny jammies, onesies, blankies, bottles . . . and books.

As a children’s author and college professor, I’m happy to give books as gifts and to see them being given. Some shower invitations these days suggest, “One request that isn’t too hard, please give a book instead of a card.”

So here’s a baby shower gift book idea: Mem Fox’s Reading Magic: Why Reading Aloud to Our Children Will Change Their Lives Forever. I had the pleasure of hearing Fox discuss Reading Magic in person a while back and have recommended it to my children’s literature students ever since.

This week, I’ve reread it from a different perspective. Not as author. Not as professor, but as Grandma to two grandsons: a toddler and a newborn.

Reading Magic“The best time to start reading aloud to a baby is the day it is born,” Fox recommends. I quickly called my son after rereading this advice. Have you read to the baby yet? I asked (after all he’s almost two weeks old). It’s really important!

As Fox puts it, reading aloud “positively affects children’s brains, hearts, words, and futures.” In Reading Magic, she expands on each of these, telling why, when, how and what to read aloud. The book is divided into bite-size sections so busy parents (or grandparents, teachers and others) can easily read it and use the tips right away.

Which books do you like to give at baby showers?

Shower Power: Give a Book!

Wonder: Humorous children’s book about acceptance, kindness

Author Sarah Lynn Scheerger talks about the book Wonder in this week’s Friday reads. Scheerger is the author of The Opposite of Love (hardcover 2014; paperback Fall 2015), and Are You Still There? (Fall 2015).

TheOppositeofLoveAreYouStillThere

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Why is R.J. Palacio’s Wonder so wonderful?

“Born with a terrible facial abnormality, Auggie has been home-schooled by his parents his whole life, in an attempt to protect him from the cruelty of the outside world. Now, for the first time, he’s being sent to a real school – and he’s dreading it. All he wants is to be accepted – but can he convince his new classmates that he’s just like them, underneath it all?” –Goodreads.com

I know why I think so. The heartbreakingly real characters, true to life. The careful introduction of issues that make us think and feel. The quick moving plot. Boy appeal. Humor that makes me smile while reading. The beginning hooks the readers right away. The authentic character voices that speak in real and meaningful ways.

Pg. 3 “I won’t describe what I look like. Whatever you’re thinking, it’s probably worse.”

Her succinct and accurate portrayal of character.

Page 34 “…so is he the kind of kid who’s one way in front of grown-ups and another way in front of kids?”

I think the sense of humor intertwined with real issues is part of what makes this so enjoyable. Consider these sections:

Page 64

“Are you always going to look this way, August? I mean, can’t you get plastic surgery or something?”

I smiled and pointed to my face. “Hello? This is after plastic surgery!”

Jack clapped his hand over his forehead and started laughing hysterically.

“Dude, you should sue your doctor!” he answered between giggles.

The cover is tasteful, appealing, and intriguing. Palacio changes POV, so that we hear multiple perspectives in ways that slightly overlap but still push the story forward. We have empathy for the ways people act, and we understand their motivations.

Wonder

Of course there’s a clear hook for upper elementary and middle school teachers. What a great way to spark discussion about friendship, acceptance, differences, school culture, bullying and kindness.

As a school social worker, I have the pleasure of visiting many elementary and middle school classes. It’s a breath of fresh air when I walk into a classroom and see that each student has created their own one-eyed “wonder-esque” face to post around the room. Think of the classroom discussions that can ensue after reading aloud Mr. Tushman’s end of the year speech about being “kinder than necessary.” Mr. Browne’s precepts are another great source of discussion material.

But what do kids think? Why do they love it? I’ll confess that my eleven-year-old has read and re-read this book five times. He’s a kid who typically gravitates to fantasy, action, or sci-fi. Realistic fiction isn’t his cup of tea, unless it’s historically based. But the characters in Wonder grabbed hold of his heart and head, wouldn’t let go.

I asked him this question—“Why is Wonder worth reading?”

All of his comments referenced the feelings invoked within himself as he connected with these masterful characters. He said,“I felt sympathetic for Auggie. I could imagine how Jack Will felt when he accidentally hurt his friend’s feelings. I felt a proud feeling when the kids from his school protected Auggie during the movie.”

Then I asked, “Why is Wonder worth re-reading?”

He smiled, and said, “Just… the book is so… amazing.”

Or shall I say Wonder-ful?

Wonder: Humorous children’s book about acceptance, kindness