Beep Beep: Make Way for Big Trucks and Ducks

With sunny skies and warm breezes filling the day, kids, ducks, and dump trucks alike are now out to play. With a “Beep, beep” there and a “crash, crash” there, construction noise fills the air like pollen. Children welcome this noise as if it is an orchestral composition, and adults everywhere are left curious as to what is so special about construction sites.

Adults are still puzzled as to why children find big trucks so fascinating. Perhaps it’s the mess, the noise, or the size, but kids everywhere are drawn to dump trucks. Maybe it is because little hands can only move little handfuls of sand, or dirt. Yet trucks can move loads because trucks are tough. There’s just something about a construction site that pulls at the heartstrings of children. One thing is certain though that this construction magic is captured in the bright book, Dump Truck Duck.

9780807517369_DumpTruckDuckNot only does this adorable book convey the coolness of the construction site, but it also speaks volumes about teamwork. Dump Truck Duck’s use of furry ducklings and construction vehicles as a way to express a tale of consideration and helping others is nothing short of special. This book demonstrates the power of working together to get the task at hand completed, and the book also acknowledges that mistakes happen. It is a gentle reminder for children to act with kindness and showcase a positive attitude.

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Host a quacktastic party!

After a long day of sandbox play, there is nothing quite as special as reading about the strength of a truck. Dump Truck Duck, comparable to Goodnight, Goodnight Construction Site, is a heartwarming tale. It is certainly fit as a bedtime story to cap off a day spent playing in the playground, or an at-home remedy when rain clouds move in. Dump Truck Duck is really the perfect companion to any kind of day, filled with any kind of play, and a reminder of how much can be accomplished when everyone works together.

Beep Beep: Make Way for Big Trucks and Ducks

5 reasons to read Lilliput on your vacation

by author Suzanne Slade

I’m obsessed with nonfiction books. I like to read thick, technical science books for fun. I read piles of children’s nonfiction picture books to keep abreast of what’s on the market (and because I love them!) On the rare occasion when I do read fiction, it’s a refreshing treat, and I’m pleased to share a new fiction gem I enjoyed while on vacation this summer—Lilliput.

Lilliput cover

To become my official vacation read, Lilliput first had to earn a place in my suitcase. (Sidenote: After years of intensive training, my husband has converted me to a “ultra-light” packer, so this means there was room for only one book in my small bag.) The night before I was to leave on my trip I hadn’t selected a book yet; there were several on my nightstand I’d been wanting to read. I made the executive decision to read the first chapter of each to determine which one was worthy of the trip. Well, the first chapter of Lilliput (only seven pages) hooked me immediately, and it won the spot in my bag.

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  1. The book was so compelling I finished it long before I returned home from vacation. I love how the main character, Lily, is a great role model for young readers with her unwavering determination and kind nature, despite the constant challenges she faces while trying to make her way back home to Lilliput.
  2. Lilly2The giant villain, Lemuel Gulliver, who kidnapped Lily and held her hostage for proof of his discoveries, supplied wonderful humor—with just the right amount of evil. I enjoyed how the author developed this character, and found myself feeling a tad empathetic toward the giant as I learned of his hopes and disappointments.
  3. Then there’s Finn, the hero, who was trapped by a unique prison of his own, yet he looked beyond his dire circumstances and bravely helped Lily escape.
  4. lily3To top it all off, the illustrations by Alice Ratterree are outstanding! The details she included are incredible, and her lovely action-filled pictures have heart.
  5. In the book’s Afterword, the author, Sam Gayton, shares his initial hesitation to write a story based on characters from Jonathan Swift’s classic tale, Gulliver’s Travels, due to concerns about copyright infringement. He relates a charming family anecdote about how his mom allayed his copyright fears when she declared (with a mouth full of dry scone crumbs), “Miffs fin rer fubric fromay.” Translation—“Gulliver’s Travels is in the public domain.”

If you’re looking for a great read to finish off your summer vacation, especially before heading back to school, Lilliput is the perfect choice. This fresh, daring story about a small girl’s quest for big things—freedom, friendship, and family—is truly magical.

Suzanne Slade is the award-winning author of 100 children’s books. Most days you’ll find her researching new book ideas, reading, writing children’s books, or visiting a school near you!

5 reasons to read Lilliput on your vacation

Reading Aloud—To Your TWEEN?

Lori Haskins Houran is a children’s book editor and the author of several books for young children, including How to Spy on A Shark. Lori shares some of her favorite tales to read out loud to her tweens in this week’s Friday Reads!

It is weird that I read to my kids every night?

They’re not little. My younger son is 9, and my older son turns 12 next month. They’ve been reading independently for years now, but they still insist that I read aloud at bedtime. The few times I’ve tried to beg off—I’m tired./I have a sore throat./Downton Abbey is coming on!—they’ve looked as shocked as if I suggested skipping dinner.

Pippi LongstockingSideways Stories from Wayside School

Occasional slacking aside, I do love reading to my boys. It’s a chance for snuggling—and smuggling. By that I mean I can sneak in personal favorites they might otherwise miss: Little House in the Big Woods, Sideways Stories from Wayside School, Pippi Longstocking, All-of-a-Kind Family. (I’m just now realizing how many of my choices feature female protagonists. Not once have my sons complained or even commented. So much for the old publishing saw that boys don’t like stories about girls.)

Charlie and the Chocolate Factorystuart little

A few other must-reads I would have added had my kids not already enjoyed them at school or on their own: Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, and the essential trio of Charlotte’s Web, The Trumpet of the Swan, and Stuart Little.

Not every selection has worked out as well as I expected. I thought my boys would enjoy The Borrowers, but they didn’t warm to it. A Wrinkle in Time felt confusing as a read-aloud, and I’m sad to say that we gave up on it after three nights. I hope my boys will read it to themselves soon and adore it as much as I do. 

a wrinkle in time

I don’t always choose the books, of course. My boys’ picks have included everything from comic books and movie tie-ins (I can tell you pretty much anything you need to know about Batman, Star Wars, and the Avengers) to gems that I might otherwise have missed, among them Jacqueline Davies’ The Lemonade War, Tom Angleberger’s Origami Yoda, and Cynthia Lord’s Rules.

rules

I don’t know long I’ll continue reading aloud to my kids. Will I Skype them in college and read The Secret Garden? No, no, that would definitely be weird…right? But for now, I’ll keep going.

Do you still read to your tweens/pre-teens? What’s on your must-read list?

Reading Aloud—To Your TWEEN?