Raising children: How to meditate

by author Whitney Stewart 

I began meditation and yoga in high school after a knee injury kept me from playing sports. At first I struggled with being still and watching my breath. Some days I felt grounded and calm. Other days I felt like a failure because my busy mind was so loud. After thirty years of practice, my mind is still busy, but I watch it as if it were a fountain of colored lights and let it be. Difficulty comes not from mental movement but from becoming lost in thought.

whitney blog post meditating 1

Meditation has taught me to experience an expanded sense of being that is not limited to body or mind. It’s as if my skin disappears and nothing separates me from anything or anyone. In this state, I lack nothing, and I’m inspired to project compassion to those who need it.

After Hurricane Katrina upended New Orleans where I live, I volunteered as a creative writing teacher in a public school. I realized quickly that my fifth-grade students were suffering from stress and family dysfunction and couldn’t easily focus on writing. They fought on the playground and acted out in class. Nobody had taught them skills to self-regulate or resolve conflict.

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I used simple meditation techniques with them — breathing and visualizations — and after some weeks, the children responded positively. “I feel like I’m floating on clouds,” one said. “It’s so peaceful,” said another. They began to concentrate more easily, to understand and follow my directions, and to write stories with more narrative depth. More importantly, they had a tool for responding to their own harmful emotions.

Meditation is an Open Sky

I wrote Meditation is an Open Sky so children can learn meditation on their own or in other classrooms or groups. I wish I’d written it sooner for my post-Katrina kids. Wherever they are now, perhaps they still remember how to focus their mind and heart and live with more ease and kindness.

What’s your favorite way to calm your mind?

Raising children: How to meditate

5 ways to experience back to school

Our authors dive into their childhoods to describe a memorable school experience as you go back to school this fall.

Linda Joy with best friend Lori bus stop first day jr high

                                   Pictured: Author Linda Joy Singleton with best friend Lori                                       at the bus stop on the first day of junior high school.

While starting a new school year could sometimes cause anxiety, especially when my best friend was going to a different school, the one thing that made returning to school fun was my back-to-school shopping day with Mom. I have three siblings so going out with Mom alone was rare. Before school started every year, each of us kids went out individually to buy school supplies and have lunch with Mom. After buying paper, pencils, binders and a new outfit to wear on the first day of school, we’d climb up to the lunch counter at Woolworths and order burgers and fries. I think I enjoyed this special lunch more than getting new clothes. And I’d always end this fun outing with a milk shake for dessert. –Linda Joy Singleton

WhitneyStewart back to school

Pictured: Author Whitney Stewart as a young child

Back to school was always hard for me. I LOVED summer swimming and bike riding. And trips to the penny-candy store. But one thing made back to school fun—BOOK FAIRS! My mom is a big reader too, and she’d let me buy an armload of books at the fair. I could trade them for my allowance. I’d stack my new books on my desk and stare at them, dreaming of the stories I’d discover. I’d smell my books and run my hands over the clean pages. I’ve never lost that love of books—new or old. As long as the teachers let me read, I was a happy girl. –Whitney Stewart 

Nancy Viau ponytail school pic

Pictured: Author Nancy Viau as a child

I couldn’t wait to go back to school every September! I had my pencils sharpened, notebooks labeled, and my Scotch-plaid school bag packed and sitting at the front door by August 1st. I have very fond memories of my metal lunchbox, a favorite back-to-school item. After all, it was also Scotch-plaid like my school bag, and it came with a matching Thermos, which meant my mom trusted me with something that could shatter in an instant if dropped. I carried it like it was a glass goblet. When the first day came, I jumped out of bed the second I was called. I dove into my outfit (skirt, cardigan, knee socks, black and white saddle shoes), and skipped to the bus stop. No one was there, of course. I was always an hour early. That back-to-school enthusiasm never faded in high school or college. Always first in class and last to leave; I never wanted to miss a thing. –Nancy Viau

sarah lynn scheerger in 7th grade

Pictured: Author Sarah Lynn Scheerger in seventh grade

Middle school is a time of change. Changing classes, changing friends, changing bodies, changing “out” for P.E. (ugh.) One special part of my routine did not change. Our English teacher, Mrs. Moore, read out loud to us for the first fifteen minutes of every class period. I had English right after lunch, and I remember sitting in my seat, listening to the shushing sound of the air conditioner, and drinking in the story. It was one of my favorite parts of each day. I particularly remember her reading the book Tuck Everlasting out loud. After she read, she’d pause and ask us what we thought of the story. Good times. –Sarah Lynn Scheerger

Alison Ashley Formento back to school

Pictured: Author Alison Formento in first grade

When I do author visits, one of the throwback photos I share is my first grade school picture. The dress I’m wearing is made from a fabric with an autumn leaf print. I loved this dress because I felt like I was wearing a tree. I loved and still love climbing trees, hiking through a thick forest, and sitting under the shade of a tree to read a book. I was a daydreamer (I still am!) in school, often looking out of the classroom windows. It helped me focus to see the trees behind our school, especially when writing or tackling math problems. It’s no different now. If I gaze at the trees in my yard, or take a nice walk in my local park, I’m always more focused when I sit down to write.  –Alison Formento

What’s your favorite back-to-school memory?

5 ways to experience back to school